Categories: Cross Stitch

The Basic of Crochet and Simple Patterns


Today, crochet is not anymore just for grandmas. Yarn design is now very popular and is anybody that has a creative sense, patience and imagination. While the patterns may seem to look so hard, when learned, one will be surprised how easy it is. Crochet projects are ideal gift items for your loved ones as well as useful in the home.

The internet has thousands of free crochet patterns from beginner to advanced that are readily availble so that you can practice simple patterns. All you need to do is browse the net and discover so many sites that makes crocheting more enjoyable.

Guide before starting:

Keep the yarn from intertwining or coiling by changing the way that you turn or flip your project after each row is completed; for instance, turn your project clockwise after you have made an even numbered line or row and then turn it counterclockwise after you have completed an odd numbered line or row.

A tapestry needle, as it has a rounded end is good for weaving the yarn ends into your project when finished. A tapestry needle number 16 that is used generally for plastic canvas basting is a suitable size to manipulate when working on “worsted weight yarn crochet patterns”. When you weave the loose ends, make sure you weave two inches going to one direction and another two inches going the opposite direction.

Learn basic crochet stitches to understand crochet patterns:

Chain stitch

To make the chain stitch, you need to create a “slip knot” so to start chaining, pass the hook underneath the yarn, pull the yarn through then catch it with your hook. Draw the yarn again back in the loop that is on your hook so to form your “first chain”. When you pass your hook underneath the yarn, this act is referred to as “yarn over”. Keep on repeating this chaining manner for as many as the pattern requires it.

Slip Stitch

The “slip stitch” is mainly used to seam “rounds” of crocheting all together. The slip stitch has no tallness therefore it can not be made into rows. Insert your hook in the chain then “yarn over” and draw a loop passing the chain. Draw then the new loop passing the “old loop”.

“Single crochet” stitch

To practice this stitch, make fifteen chain stitches. Insert your hook in the second chain from the hook “yarn over” and draw a loop going through the “chain”. “Yarn over” once more and draw the new loop going through “two loops” on your hook.
In each chain row that you make, work through a “single crochet” at the end of the row “chain 1 and then turn”.

“Half double crochet” stitch

Make fifteen chain stitches first, to practice, then “yarn over” the hook once. Insert your hook in the third chain from your hook and “yarn over” then draw a loop going through the chain twice. “Yarn over” and draw the yarn going through all the three loops on your hook and make a “half double crochet” in each chain stitch across. Then make two chain stitches and flip to the other side.

“Double crochet” stitch

”Yarn over” you hook once and then insert the hook in the fourth chain counting from the hook; “yarn over” and draw the yarn going through two loops on the hook and “yarn over” once more and draw it towards you going through the remaining two loops on the hook. Make a “double crochet stitch” in each chain stitch across and at the end make three chain stitches and turn. Make a “double crochet stitch” in each stitch across

“Triple crochet” stitch

Practice by making fifteen chain stitches. Yarn over the hook twice and insert the hook in the fifth chain from the hook, (*) “yarn over” and then go through two loops on the hook; repeat two more times.

Checking the pattern gauge

To check your pattern gauge, you need to stitch an unattached work sample before you begin your project; normally at twenty stitches across, fifteen rows high and measure or calculate from the inside rows that is the main portion of your project; compare this alongside what the gauge of the pattern says.

When your sample is found to be too large then you need to use a hook of a smaller size and making another sample and check again the gauge.

When your sample is found to be too small then you need to use another hook of a larger size, stitching another work sample.

Keep on practicing and in time, you will be able to identify and do all the stitches with ease!

Categories: Cross Stitch

An Overview Of The Different Kinds Of Cross Stitch Kits

Cross stitching is a great method to exercise your creativity and produce fantastic designs. There are several types of cross stitch sets depending on the approach of sewing. These already come with everything you need to get stitching such as needles, DMC embroidery threads,  and the like.

In this post, we go over the different kinds of cross stitch kits so that you can pick what suits you best.  These are counted sets, stamped, embellished and no-count kits.

Counted Kits

The counted cross stitch kit includes a chart or pattern of the design you are going to sew, and you have to calculate the squares in your cloth or material to match those in the chart. It is rather easy to do this stitching particularly if you like a specific style and you wish to reproduce it correctly on your fabric, although it can be troublesome if you lose count and sew in the wrong square. This kit is ideal for beginners since you have to follow directions to master the craft before you can make your very own designs.

Stamped Kits

The 2nd kind of cross stitch kits in Australia is what we call a stamped kit. To work on this kit, you do not need any chart because the design is printed directly on the fabric. All you need to do is to stitch the fabric inning accordance with the colours printed on it. Nevertheless easy this may sound, you may have a bit of problem getting the ideal colours if they are a shade or 2 just like each other. Attempt stamp sets that have a simple design which will decrease the possibilities of error and accustom you to the colour distinction.

Embellished Packages

If you desire a faster stitching project, the embellished stitching kit is precisely what you require. The latter is keen to stamped kits because the style is printed on the fabric, however with decorated, the parts you stitch om are the ornamental bits of the design. You need not sew the whole plan, however, concentrate on the labelled parts on the printed fabric. Completing an embellished style of fasts, yet not always easy. Some methods in adorned packages might need you to cross-stitch at a particular angle which might make it more difficult to match up the decorated part with the remainder of the design.

No-count Sets

Lastly, the no-count kit comes with a chart for the colours to stitch. However, the outline of the figure or design is precisely what is already printed on the fabric. It is much easier compared to the counted kit since you are not strictly following the squares on the style, but on the downside, if the summary crosses the middle of a square, it ends up being a little difficult to decide which colour goes where.

Categories: Crochet

Kinds of Crochet Patterns for Beginners


When just beginning to crochet, keep in mind that your first work must be easy and something that is fun to do. Select a pattern that needs no or very little shaping like a pillow or a scarf. Tote bags and hats are also simple projects to make requiring very little shaping.

There are a wide selection of colors and yarns so you can choose what colors suit you best, but remember to begin with a moderately smooth yarn that is easy to handle, like a worsted-weight type of yarn.

Patterns that use large hooks or needles and two threads of yarn can be great first projects because will be fast to complete. Search for patterns that are marked as “beginner”.

Here is a pattern that when accomplished, makes a 7 inches by 9 inches block that can be a good practice for beginners; also, with these basic crochet pattern, one can easily create a scarf, pillow or a doily:

Materials needed:

• Any color of yarn that is Worsted-weight

• Size 8, and 14 inches long “knitting needles”

• Big eye yarn needle

• Small scissors

“Casting On”

1. Create a “slip knot” on the needle’s shaft, on one needle.

2. Put this “needle” in your left hand, and hold the other needle on your right hand so you can manage the yarn. Insert the point of the “right needle”, starting from the front to the back, in the “slip knot” and underneath the “left needle”.

3. While holding the left needle which is still in your left hand, move your “left fingers” over so that it braces the right needle.

4. With your index finger at the right, get the “yarn from the ball”.

5. Let go your grip on the right hand that id holding the needle and use your index finger so to carry the yarn “under and over” the right needle’s point.

6. Return your “right fingers” to the right needle, then pull the yarn all through the stitch with the point of the right needle.

7. Slide the point of the left needle unto the back of the new stitch, and take off the right needle.

8. Gently pull the ball of yarn to create the stitch that should fit well on the needle. Now you have successfully made a stitch known as casting on.

9. Insert the point of the “right needle”, starting from the front to the back, and into the stitch you have just made, under the left needle. Then repeat steps five up to step nine 26 times, up until you will have “28 stitches” on your left needle. This now completes the “cast-on row”.

“First knit row”:

1. Hold the needle having the stitches on your left hand and insert the point of the “right needle” in the first stitch, starting from the front to the back, same as in “casting on”.

2. With your “right index finger”, draw the yarn from its ball underneath and then over the point of the right needle.

3. Pull the yarn through out the stitch with the “right needle point”.

This now completes the one knit stitch. Repeat Steps 1 to 4 every stitch remains on the left needle.

Measure the piece, so that it is 7 inches wide. Start the next “knit row” as follows:

Turn the right needle then hold it in your left hand. On your right hand, with the free needle, follow steps 1 to of your “first knit row” in every stitch. Work these until the block is 9 inches long. Then “bind off” all of the stitches.

Here is a sample of a free doily pattern:

Pattern: Start at the center. Chain 5, “join in a ring”.

R1: Chain 8, * double treble crochet (thread 3 times over ) in the ring, chain 4, and then repeat from * 10 times more (12 double treble crochet total counting starting chain), join with “sl”, “st” to 5th “st” of ch-8 first made.

R2: Chain 9, double treble crochet in every double treble crochet with chain-3 between. Join with “sl”, “st” to 5th “st” of starting chain.

R3: Chain 8, * double treble crochet in the center of the chain-4 of the preceding round, chain 3, double treble crochet in the next double treble crochet, chain 3, and then repeat from * around.

R4: Chain 9, double treble crochet in every double treble crochet with chain-4 between. Join to starting chain.

R5: Chain 5. * over chain-4 work 6 double treble crochet, double treble crochet in the next ,double treble crochet, chain 5, double treble crochet in next double treble crochet, chain 5, double treble crochet in next double treble crochet, and repeat from *. Then chain 5, and join to starting chain.

R6: Chain 6. * skip 1 double treble crochet, double treble crochet in next, chain 1, and make a d treble crochet with chain-1 between in every other double treble crochet of group of previous round. Chain 6, double treble crochet in next d treble crochet, chain 6, double treble crochet in next, chain 1, and repeat from * to end of round. Chain 6, join.

R7: Chain 5, * double treble crochet in each chain and each double treble crochet until 11 double treble crochet have been made (counting ch-5 as 1st d treble crochet) chain 7, double treble crochet in next double treble crochet, chain 7, and double treble crochet in next double treble crochet, and repeat from *. Join.

R8: Chain 6 (to count as double treble crochet and chain 1). Make double treble crochet in every 2nd “st” of proceeding round with chain-1 between. Join.

R9: Chain 10, * skip 2 double treble crochet (count d treble crochet from which chain started) and make double treble crochet over next ch-1, chain 5, skip 2 d treble crochet, double treble crochet over next ch-1, chain 5, skip 2 d treble crochet, d treble crochet over next ch-1, then double treble crochet in each double treble crochet and over each ch-1 until there are 15 double treble crochet in group. Ch 5, and repeat from *. In last group, make only 14 double treble crochet, and join to 5th “st” of starting chain which is counted as double treble crochet.

R10: Chain 11, * double treble crochet in next d treble crochet, chain 6, d treble crochet in next, chain 6, double treble crochet in next, chain 1, double treble crochet in every 2nd “st” of group, always with ch-1 between, chain 6, and repeat from *. Join.

R11: Chain 12, * double treble crochet in next double treble crochet, chain 7, double treble crochet in next, chain 7, double treble crochet in each chain and each double treble crochet (15 d treble crochet in group), chain 7, and repeat from *. Join.

R12: Chain 15, * double crochet in next double treble crochet, chain 12, double crochet in next d treble crochet, chain 12, double crochet with chain-1 between in every other double treble crochet of 15 double treble crochet group (8 d c), chain 12, and repeat from *. Fasten off the thread.

Categories: Quilt

Using Quilting Tools to Make A Beautiful Quilt

The art of quilting goes back generations; a skill passed from mother to daughter and family to family. A quilt can instantly evoke a wonderful memory or a long-gone loved one; the threads of a quilt can be the threads that bind one time in history to another. Those who quilt do so with an unrivaled passion – and the expert handling of quilting tools to accomplish their task.

The modern quilt maker has the choice of doing so by hand or using any one of the contemporary machines that have given quilt making an easier, more convenient alternative. There is no right answer when it comes to machine versus hand; whichever method is more comfortable for the quilter becomes part of their quilting tools of choice.

Quilting tools are largely dependent on the quilt maker’s personal style. For those who prefer the traditional hand sewing like the quilts of yesteryear, then there a few quilting tools that are par for the course, such as a ruler, sewing scissors, quilting pins, measuring tape, quilting thread in the colors that match or complement your fabric, needles, and for the safety conscious among us – a thimble.

Ultimately, the most important of the quilting tools is the fabric that the quilt maker chooses. The style, color, and texture of the fabric will determine the look and feel of the final product; while traditional quilt makers would choose their fabric based on the scraps they had available to them, today’s quilters choose fabric largely based on the use of the quilt. Soft pastels are often used for baby quilts, bolder colors are often used to complement a room where the quilt will be hung, or different blocks of fabric are used to commemorate special events. The choices are virtually endless when it comes to choosing fabric.

Modern quilt makers find the use of a pattern or template to be an essential part of their quilting tools. Such items help guide novice quilters and provide a bevy of new ideas for experienced quilt makers.

Quilting tools are varied, and ultimately, are very personal to the quilt enthusiast’s tastes and style of working. But, the end result is all the same – a beautiful quilt to be enjoyed for generations to come.